Hey, hey, we’re still listening

pleasant valley sunday

I flicked on the oldies station and there was Micky Dolenz singing “Pleasant Valley Sunday” same as he always did. It occurred to me, as stuff like this often does, that I was listening to what Micky and his colleagues did 50 years ago.

The Monkees were criticized, and often harshly, for not being authentic because they weren’t a “real” band – they were the Pre-Fab Four, a group of young men hired to portray the band in a TV show about a mythical band.

And yet, the music has endured for 50 years. The people who created The Monkees – and that includes the four musicians who were hired to be The Monkees – perceived one important fact: If you’re going to create a fantasy about a popular band, then the band’s music ought to be good enough to be popular. How often does the suspension of disbelief fail because the “popular band” in the story just isn’t that good?

Nope, The Monkees – especially those first four albums or so – made good music. Fifty-years-later-good music. Take that, non-believers.

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10 albums that left a lasting impact on teen w.p.

There is a thing going around Facebook: List 10 albums that made a lasting impression on you as a teenager but only one per band/artist. Don’t take too long and don’t think too hard.

OK, I can do that, although I almost forgot I was still a teenager the first year and a half of college; otherwise I was drawing a blank. Probably thinking too hard.

In the order they occurred to me, not a ranking:

1. Sgt. Pepper – Beatles
2. Ladies of the Canyon – Joni Mitchell
3. On the Threshold of a Dream – Moody Blues
4. Bayou Country – Creedence Clearwater Revival
5. Lazarus – Lazarus
6. Cellophane Symphony – Tommy James & the Shondells
7. Headquarters – The Monkees
8. Uncle Charlie & His Dog Teddy – Nitty Gritty Dirt Band
9. Judee Sill – Judee Sill
10. Kongos – John Kongos

And of all those albums, the track that started buzzing through my head as I compiled the list was this one. I bought the album based solely on the radio play of “Proud Mary” at that moment in time plus a magazine article I’d read with John Fogerty describing their musical mission. By the end of this first track I was a diehard fan.

I should go through the list and do a post on some of those more obscure titles. Got any favorites from your own teenage years?