In which we tire of embracing the hatred and instead embrace puppies

trunk full of puppies

The world needs more puppies and fewer politicians. Politicians like to tell you they know better and the world should just do as they say. They fill the air with greenhouse gases and endanger every species.

Puppies, on the other hand, have no purpose other than to soothe the soul. They emit playful barks and wag their tails and are happy just to be alive and well and loving the fact that today is today and it’s like nothing they’ve ever seen before and holy moley is that my ball? Can I have it? Can I chase it? Yes, I’m going to get that ball unless a squirrel, because then I’ll chase the squirrel yes. Yes.

Puppies are all about yes. Politicians are all about no. Puppies are all about life. Politicians are all about do as I say or we’re all going to die. Puppies are all about freedom. Politicians are all about fear. and anger. and do as I say or else.

So, you go on about awful. Politicians have always been awful and trying to be more awful than any who came before, disguised as a rescuing hero which none of them will save your life.

Prattle on, prattle on, there’s a good sheep. As for me: Puppies!

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A higher and independent authority

dejah in backyard

“There will never be a really free and enlightened State until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly.”

— Henry David Thoreau, 1817-1862

We want to be peaceful

2904 we want to be peaceful

News note: 50 years ago this month, the St. Norbert College chapter of Students for a Democratic Society quietly disbanded. “We want to be peaceful – completely nonviolent and peaceful,” chapter president Greg McHugh said. “SDS no longer represents all students, but only those seeking violent revolution.”

In this time, when the president is a caricature, and left and right alike seek blood at every turn, where are those who want to be peaceful – completely nonviolent and peaceful? Does anyone really want this to be a violent and aggressive world? Besides the mad, that is?

As precious and special as life is, why would anyone sane wish to extinguish as many lives as possible in one fell swoop? Why would anyone sane wish to obliterate a single life?

“You can’t beat us,” the bullies sometimes tell us.

Malcolm Reynolds, stalwart captain of the space freighter Serenity, had the best-ever response: “I got no need to beat you. I just want to go my way.”

Listen to those who add value

2943 - dark at dawn

What’s with all the discouraging words? Home, home with the strange, where the crackpot politicians play, where seldom is heard an encouraging word and the skies are just cloudy all day.

Sow discord, reap the whirlwind. These gardeners have been tilling the soil with seeds of hate, envy, fear and loathing for so long, it’s hard to breathe with all these weeds choking the air.

Fortunately, there is a solution. Stop listening, for one. Much of their power is in the silver tongue of false promises and false prophecies. (”The world as we know it will end unless you give me more power!!!”)

Whatever is good – think on those things. Listen to those who add value to life: the builders, not the petty demolition experts. Turn off the noise …

W.B.’s Book Report: Mockingbird

MockingbirdTevis-238x238It’s 300 or 400 years in the future, give or take. Robots are in charge, sort of, and people spend most of their time avoiding each other and popping pills that leave them pretty doped up most of the time. Close interaction with others, including eye contact, is strenuously discouraged if not outright illegal. Now and then two or three people get together and immolate themselves, for no readily apparent reason. Oh, and there don’t seem to be any children around. Continue reading “W.B.’s Book Report: Mockingbird”

W.B.’s Book Report: They Thought They Were Free

they thought they were free
Milton Mayer’s book subtitled “The Germans 1933-45” is a remarkable bit of work. Mayer lived in Germany for a few years after the close of World War II and wanted to know how ordinary folks could have allowed the oppressive regime led by Adolf Hitler to seize control of their country and their lives.

The title of the book says it all: They thought they were free.

Mayer writes about his friendship with 10 men and his conversations about their everyday lives in a relatively small town. He paints a plausible portrait of people only tangentially aware that their government was descending into totalitarianism and tyranny — because they were busy living their lives and it usually didn’t affect them directly. Continue reading “W.B.’s Book Report: They Thought They Were Free”